BDSM Terminology Explained(Aftercare/Sub Drop/Limits/Safewords)


BDSM Terminology Explained(Aftercare/Sub Drop/Limits/Safewords)


There are so many terms in BDSM that it can often be confusing so we thought it would be a good idea to explain some terms in a series of articles. As we grow, we will add more articles and expand on the terminology. We ask all our readers to comment below on any terms they would like explained further or to contribute. Please always remember that all play must be safe, sane, and consensual (SSC). Let the BDSM terminology explanations begin!


Aftercare


Aftercare isn’t technically a kink, but it’s another word that anyone engaging in kinky play needs to know. It’s basically a fancy word for checking in with one another after a scene to make sure all parties are happy and comfortable with what happened. If anything about the scene felt off or you didn’t like, it’s also a great time to discuss that and make sure the next time is better. Checking in with someone the next day and ensuring they are not experiencing sub drop or helping them through it if they are is also an important part of aftercare. Aftercare is not limited to the moments directly after a scene but the days following it as well.



Sub Drop


Sub Drop can be an emotional or physical low, that one can experience anywhere from a few hours to a few days after an emotional or endorphin high and can last hours to weeks. It is important to note that Doms can also experience sub drop.


Limits


Consent is fundamental part of any alternative lifestyle play. If you are just starting your journey into kink or fetishes be sure to sit down and write a list of items that you consider off limits for whatever reason. A soft limit is something that you’re curious about yet unsure if it’s right for you so you might be willing to try it once. A hard limit is something that you are certain is off-limits and you would never like to try. Writing out your hard and soft limits with a partner is a wonderful way to get to know another side of each other. Your hard and soft limits will likely evolve the more you explore, so it's important to keep having these conversations with your partner.


Safe Words


Safe words go hand in hand with limits. It can be an actual word, series of words or a physical gesture. It is a way to communicate to your partner that everything is ok, they should slow down or you are in distress and the paly should stop immediately. It is quite common to use a robot or traffic light system where green means all is good continue, yellow is slow down and let's reassess and red is stop and all play should be suspended.




We would love to hear anything you have to add to our explanations.





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